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PPC blog

Closing the loop – factors in choosing the right fiber closure

Posted by Dave Stockton

Closures are the housings which contain and protect the individual joints in any fiber system, as opposed to fiber joining (fusion splicing, connectorization and mechanical splicing), which are covered in this separate blog. Given how fragile fiber is, and the potential need to upgrade cables, good quality closures are vital to a successful installation. But what is a closure and what should you be looking for when choosing one?

Types of closures

Basic Closures

At its simplest, a closure joins one length of fiber cable to a different length of the same type of cable. This is sometimes known as in-line closure or track joint. Added functionality is provided by a spur (or branch) joint which divides the cable into two ongoing parts - the main cable and a side or spur cable. There are also end of route closures where the cable is broken out into individual elements for customer or telco connection.

Topics: Design and Install, Fiber to the home, Industrial premises

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Joining fiber cable – what are the options?

Posted by John Dawson

However well you plan your installation, fiber cable is rarely the right length for each run, and is inherently difficult to join. Consequently, cables have to be connected or cut in the field, with the potential issues this entails. This blog post looks at the various options available to installers for responding to these issues; from splicing and field-fit connectors to factory-terminated or pre-connectorization.

1. Splicing in the field

When fiber was first deployed, it was mechanically spliced, meaning that fibers were butted together as tightly as possible and then mechanically encapsulated. Due to the potential for signal loss and poor reliability this was soon superseded by fusion splicing. This offers the best quality connection of all in-field options in that the fiber ends are lined up and welded together. No excess cable is left over when the process is complete.

Topics: Design and Install, Costs/ROI, Industrial premises

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Six fiber deployment nightmares – and how they were solved

Posted by Rich Contreras

Every fiber network installation is unique, with its own set of challenges to be overcome. Whether it is a topographical problem that needs to be factored into planning or an issue that comes up while on-site, everyone that has been involved with fiber deployments has their own particular war stories which have been solved with a combination of ingenuity, experience and technology. Here is a selection of our own favorites – in the case of our experiences we’ve changed names to protect everyone involved.

Topics: Design and Install, Fiber to the home, Industrial premises

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Which last drop fiber installation method is best for you?

Posted by Tom Carpenter

In our series of blogs based on PPC’s Complete Guide to Fiber to the Premises (FTTP) Deployment eBook, we’ve outlined the options for operators, when it comes to:

The 5 last drop fiber installation methods

Moving on, operators then have to choose the installation method for the last drop of their FTTP network. Based on our experience, here are the pros and cons of the main techniques, along with some more detailed analysis:

Topics: Design and Install, Fiber to the home, Industrial premises

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How Comcast is achieving fiber protection in inside plant environments

Posted by Dan Patuto

Extending high speed fiber access through inside plant installations within buildings is often difficult, expensive and time consuming.

Often installations have to fit within very small spaces, such as congested ducts, and take up as little real estate as possible so as not to interfere with working areas. The environment is dynamic - floor plans change and new equipment is installed, so deployments need to be flexible and easy to upgrade, and if necessary re-route.

Fiber has to be protected with cables and ducts that are tough enough to withstand wear and tear from a whole range of enemies, such as accidental knocks from rogue technicians/installers, as well as needing to be small and easy to install. Protecting business critical data and communications that travel over fiber cables is a priority, but this requirement can be in conflict with the need to save space.

Topics: Design and Install, Industrial premises

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Fiber to the campus - overcoming fiber optic installation challenges

Posted by Shaun Trezise

Modern higher education is increasingly underpinned by technology. Whatever the subject, teaching, research and administration all rely on the fast transmission of data to students, professors and staff.

And with intense competition for the best students and researchers, a slow network can mean the brightest minds go elsewhere.

High speed fiber networks are therefore crucial parts of the infrastructure of university and college campuses across the world.

The challenges of campus networking

Rolling out a fiber network across a university campus is complex and potentially costly for four key reasons:

Topics: Fiber to the premises, Design and Install, Industrial premises

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Fiber protection – in the toughest of conditions

Posted by Tom Carpenter

In business, everyone expects high quality products and services, meaning that praise from customers is pretty rare. So, when our US partner Core Telecom forwarded me this email from Rich Jones of Metasoft Inc. I have to say it made my day.

Normally in our blogs, we focus on sharing our knowledge and expertise with the industry, rather than talking about ourselves or our products. However, I felt compelled to share this email, so I hope you forgive me this one exception:

Hello Rene,

All is well. Much has happened with regards to the Tuff Duct and Miniflex fiber at the site where it was installed.

Topics: Design and Install, Industrial premises

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